On October 12, 2017, the United States lifted its general commercial embargo on Sudan. Because Sudan has played a role in international terrorism, the U.S. has maintained a comprehensive embargo against Sudan since 1997. These sanctions were contained in executive orders and the Sudanese Sanctions Regulations (SSR).

Following a 16-month diplomatic effort, the United States removed sanctions that had prohibited U.S. persons from engaging in or facilitating most transactions that involved Sudan or its government. U.S. persons may now engage in most transactions without the need for a general or specific license from the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC).

On January 17, 2017, the U.S. temporarily lifted sanctions with respect to Sudan and its government. OFAC issued a general license that temporarily authorized transactions prohibited by the SSR, which was contingent on the U.S. government’s determination regarding Sudan’s developments in key areas. Earlier this month, the Secretary of State provided a determination to President Trump that the government of Sudan has made positive development in the cessation of hostilities in conflict areas, improving humanitarian access throughout Sudan, and addressing regional conflicts and threats of terrorism.

Effective October 12, 2017, the temporary general license is no longer operable and OFAC authorization is not required for proposed transactions that were previously prohibited by the SSR, unless the proposed transaction implicates the Darfur Sanctions Regulations or other OFAC-administered sanctions regulations.

While most sanctions were lifted, significant restrictions remain in place for those seeking to trade with Sudan, primarily with respect to export controls and individuals and entities listed on the Specially Designated Nationals List (SDN List). OFAC sanctions related to the conflict in Darfur still remain in place, and the revocation does not affect OFAC’s designations of any Sudanese persons pursuant to other sanctions authorities.

Additionally, this does not impact Sudan’s status as a state sponsor of terrorism. Pursuant to the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000 (TSRA), an OFAC license is still required for certain exports and reexports to Sudan of agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical devices as a result of Sudan’s inclusion on the State Sponsors of Terrorism List (SST List).

General License A, which went into effect on October 12, 2017, authorizes exports and reexports of certain TSRA items to Sudan. General License A is available for review here. General License A replaces the need for any existing general or specific licenses currently issued to authorize conduct that was otherwise prohibited under the Sudan sanctions program.

U.S. persons are still required to comply with the export and reexport controls of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) administered by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS). These requirements include restrictions that are maintained as a consequence of Sudan’s inclusion on the SST List and apply to certain exports and reexports of items on the Commerce Control List. BIS also maintains end-use and end-user controls on the export and reexport to Sudan of EAR99 items by U.S. persons and non-U.S. persons.

Despite lifting the general commercial embargo on Sudan, the sanctions revocation does not affect past, present or future OFAC enforcement actions related to violations of the SSR that occurred prior to January 17, 2017. Additionally, the revocation does not mean that sanctions cannot be quickly reimposed by the U.S.