International Trade Commission (ITC)

 

On Wednesday, the U.S. Department of Commerce began its preliminary phase antidumping and countervailing duty investigations pursuant to the Tariff Act of 1930. The Department of Commerce is looking into whether the imports of stainless steel flanges from China and India, which are alleged to be sold in the U.S. at less than fair value and alleged to be subsidized by the Chinese and Indian governments, are materially injuring the U.S. industry.

The U.S. antidumping law imposes special tariffs to counteract imports that are sold in the U.S. at less than fair value. The U.S. countervailing duty law imposes special tariffs to counteract imports that are sold in the U.S. with the benefit of foreign government subsidies. For these duties to be imposed, the U.S. government must determine that there is material injury, or a threat of material injury, by reason of the dumped and/or subsidized imports.

The probe by the Department of Commerce comes after two privately held companies filed petitions. The two petitioners are the individual members of the Coalition of American Flange Producers: Core Pipe Products, Inc. and Maass Flange Corporation. The petitioners alleged dumping margins in China ranging from 99.23% to 257.11%, and for India margins ranging from 78.49% to 145.25%.

The products covered by these investigations are certain forged stainless steel flanges, whether unfinished, semi-finished or finished. The term “stainless steel” refers to an alloy steel containing, by actual weight, 1.2% or less of carbon and 10.5% or more of chromium, with or without other elements.

It is the job of the Department of Commerce to determine whether the alleged dumping or subsidizing is occurring, and if so, the margin of dumping or the amount of the subsidy. The United States International Trade Commission (“USITC”) will determine whether the U.S. industry is materially injured or threatened with material injury by reason of the imports under investigation. If both the Department of Commerce and the USITC reach affirmative final determinations, then the Department of Commerce will issue an antidumping or a countervailing duty order to offset the subsidy.

The USITC is scheduled to make its preliminary determination regarding the injury on or before October 2, 2017. If the USITC determines that there is injury, the investigations will continue, and the Department of Commerce will makes its preliminary countervailing duty determination in November 2017, and its antidumping determination in January 2018, though these dates may be extended.

The results of the investigation could impact both importers and purchasers. Importers will be liable for any potential duties that are imposed by the U.S. government. Purchases could be impacted because the determination could result in increased prices and/or decreased supply of stainless steel flanges.

On the firm’s Energy Law Today blog, Fox Partner Mark V. Santo discusses the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and its potential impact on the natural gas trade between the U.S. and Mexico.

North America from space
Copyright: antartis / 123RF Stock Photo

“Mexico imports nearly all of its natural gas from the U.S. and exports to Mexico are expected to double by 2019, with Texas fields being the primary source. At least 17 pipelines currently carry four billion cubic feet of natural gas a day from Texas to Mexico, with four additional cross-border pipelines in the works. Mexico’s demand for U.S.-sourced natural gas has been a boon to domestic producers as it has greatly offset the oversupply of natural gas production. Without this outlet to Mexico, natural gas producers in the U.S. will face a severe downturn with wells shut, job losses and investment curtailed.

The U.S.-Mexico natural gas symbiotic relationship is just one example of the tri-nation supply chain intricacies and complexities forged under NAFTA. There are countless others, such as deep supply chains in agriculture, construction materials and autos to name a few….”

Mark notes the key provisions of the agreement that the Trump Administration will seek to alter. These provisions relate to the remedies available should a NAFTA nation’s exports injure the domestic market of another NAFTA member.

To read Mark’s full post, please visit the Energy Law Today blog.

The International Trade Commission (ITC) issued an order on January 27, 2017,  barring the import table saws produced by German tool manufacturer, Robert Bosch GmbH (“Bosch”). The ITC determined that the components of Bosch’s REAXX safety technology infringed the two patents held by US-based SawStop LLC (“SawStop”).  As described in a press release at the outset of the ITC’s investigation, both the saws produced by SawStop and by Bosch contain active injury mitigation technologies which are able to detect when a user comes into contact with the blade can avoid catastrophic injury.

As the ITC had previously determined that Bosch’s saws infringed two of SawStop’s patents, the ITCs recent order was limited to Bosch’s request that the ITC forego any penalties and permit the continued importation of its saws because: (1) SawStop did not have the manufacturing and distribution capacity to meet US demand and (2) by preventing the import of Bosch’s safer saw, the ITC would be increasing potential injuries to consumers.  Indeed, Bosch cited to “millions or billions of dollars” in societal costs for severe injuries from the use of unsafe saws. Ultimately, Bosch’s argument that US consumers should be afforded the ability to buy saws with the latest safety technology (leaving aside the countless antiquated table saws that fill factories and wood shops across the country) was unpersuasive.  Further, the ITC appeared to accept that SawStop was capable of meeting demand and ordered that all of Bosch’s infringing saws be excluded.