On August 12, CBP confirmed that the recent revocation of Hong Kong’s “special status” and updated China marking requirements would not render goods of Hong Kong origin subject to the additional Section 301 tariffs imposed on most goods of Chinese origin. CBP stated that “the change in marking requirements does not affect country of origin

UPDATE: CBP has extended the compliance period for origin marking for an additional 45 days. In an effort to allow importers ample time to comply with EO requirements for goods produced in Hong Kong to be appropriately marked with the origin of “China”, CBP is extending the transition period through November 9, 2020.  Accoringly,

On August 6 the Trump Administration announced that it would reimpose the 10% aluminum tariff on imports of Canadian “non-alloy unwrought aluminum” classified under HTS subheading 7601.10. The move has not garnered widespread support from industry or the US Chamber of Commerce, who called it “a step in the wrong direction.” The Administration’s proclamation claims

The fact that the US-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“USMCA”), which replaced NAFTA on July 1, does not require any particular form Certificate of Origin (“COO”) has left many importers and exporters confused on the proper manner of certifying goods as “originating” under USMCA. The new trade agreement dispensed with the formality of the Form 434 COO under

Now that Canadian PM Justin Trudeau has dissolved Parliament and called for a general election (to be held October 21), chances of seeing the USMCA ratified by all three member states this year has become an increasingly remote possibility. However, the good news for USMCA supporters is that NAFTA’s replacement continues to enjoy support in

On Friday, August 23, the Trump Administration announced an increase in Section 301 tariffs following China’s announcement of retaliatory tariffs targeting $75 billion of US goods. The announcement, which came by way of tweet, provided that Section 301 tariffs on all List 1 through 3 goods would be elevated from 25% to 30% effective October

Though the USMCA has been ratified by Mexico, the trade agreement still faces a vote in Canada and, perhaps more concerning, the US. Under the Trade Promotion Authority (“TPA”), both houses of US Congress must vote in favor of the implementing bill, which is expected to be submitted to Congress after September 1. Submission of

On August 13, the Trump Administration announced the “next steps” in implementation of the approximately $300 billion in additional tariffs set to go into effect September 1.  This fourth round of Section 301 tariffs (known as “List 4”) was originally announced on May 17; however, the USTR has now modified and separated that list into

On November 30, 2018, the United States, Canada and Mexico took the first steps toward a renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)—now dubbed the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). However, the USMCA still faces the hurdles of ratification by the respective governments. In the United States, that means Congressional approval in accordance with the Trade